Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Voice of The Voiceless: The Untold Stories of Girls and Women of War


Africa Mi Tierra is *sole manager* of the FB page Voice of the Voiceless: The Untold Stories of Girls and Women of War. "For the last few days FB will not allow me to post any content on the page, saying I don't have permission to view my own page. I have reported it. But I do NOT think it is a FB glitch. I think it is intentional because of the subject matter. Can you help in any way, or have any ideas on what I can do. I would be most grateful. I will not be silenced. Women's lives depend on that. Thank you."

"This Is An Open Message That FACEBOOK Will No Longer Allow Me To Post Any Content To My Own Page That I Manage Below. IT HAS BEEN REPORTED AND THEY ARE VIOLATING MY CIVIL LIBERTIES, MOST LIKELY DUE TO THE SUBJECT MATTER OF MY PAGE !!! FB BE WARNED THAT I HAVE AN ATTORNEY ON ONE LINE, AND THE ACLU ON THE OTHER !!! THIS WILL NOT BE TOLERATED !!!!

THEY SAY I DON'T HAVE PERMISSION TO MY OWN PAGE !!!!"

Please support Africa by 'liking' her page, Voice of The Voiceless: The Untold Stories of Girls and Women of War, and sharing posts.

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Facebook Has an Incest Problem - Trigger warning


This extraordinarily creepy post is still up despite many complaints to Facebook.

Facebook responded:

We reviewed your report of Kinky Geeks of Chicago's photo

Thank you for taking the time to report something that you feel may violate our Community Standards. Reports like yours are an important part of making Facebook a safe and welcoming environment. We reviewed the photo you reported for containing nudity and found it doesn't violate our Community Standards.



There is not a good way to report posts like this.  When I tried to report it myself, I listed my grievance as "This is pornography", which Facebook describes as "includes nudity, sexual arousal, sexual acts, individuals soliciting sex."  After I was told the post did not violate their community standards,  I then tried to report it as "something else"  I chose "bodily harm" of which Facebook includes "graphic injury, bodily harm or  animal abuse or torture. (Not abuse or torture of women or girls - abuse or torture of animals).

I can't think of anything that does more bodily harm than incest. Incest is it's own horrendous form of torture.

When another woman wrote to the page itself, asking them to take the picture down, she was given this reply:

"There is nothing wrong or hurtful about it. Sometimes a grown woman needs the comfort from a man that a father figure would give. this says nothing about age and appropriate boundaries are met. There is no pedophilia here. There is no abuse. There is nothing pornographic either. All it talks about is comfort, love, and security.

For the record, a "little" is an adult of consenting age that pretends to be younger. We do not promote abuse to women or children.

This is between consenting adults. If you can give a real and valid reason for it's removal I would be glad to remove it. Until then go get a good hug and feel the love...."

I have posted about Incest  promoting pages on Facebook before.  

Many pages have since been removed, but there are others still up including, but by no means limited to:
Family Incest Lovers - which actually says, "Just for fun"
Incest Stories - which promises to report your Facebook account as fake if you report them
Incest Roleplay
Incesto-30
Incesto-real
Incest Sister
as well as multiple private incest-promoting groups.

Perhaps Facebook should read Mia Fontaine's chilling Atlantic piece, America has an incest problem.

It seems that Facebook has an incest problem, too.




Sunday, November 2, 2014

'Origin of the World': Photographer Ana Alvarez-Errecalde has been Censored Again



"Last Wednesday Libe li shared one of my photographs of the project "Cesárea Beyond the Wound". It was the Photograph that made reference to the "Origin of the World" of Coubert. Several people shared their entry. Today is the photograph is no longer, and my writing has also a disappeared.
Whoever has my heart is so poor, to advocate the censorship that please me away from your friends list." - Ana Alvarez-Errecalde, translated from the original comment in Spanish


More details from Ana:

"Some people shared the photo and I even re-posted it with a statement along the following lines:

Coubert´s painting stated that the "Origin of the World" was desire and his painting was considered pornographic at the time. With my photo I like to bring attention that even if "the origin" could be understood as desire, nowadays it is not just a sexual desire but also a desire to control, a desire to have power over women and their vital cycles, an economic and biopolitical statement reflected in the always raising amounts of cesarean interventions performed daily and the common disrespectful experience that women encounter while giving birth.
 
My post disappeared without warning. All the shares of my friends' posts (with or without a new introductory text) were gone."
 


Gustave Couber, 1874-77
 
"I am fed up with the paternalistic restrictions imposed against women who do not accept to comply. I have seen a Facebook page called "putitas" (little whores) that was offering young girls for male viewer´s enjoyment. There are zillions of pages like these one (+175,900 likes and FB doesn´t care?)
 
Any image of women exposing themselves to denounce violence (being obstetric violence, restrictions of freedom - like breastfeeding in public or making public a private moment) or for  the sake of their own enjoyment is punished. I know social media mirrors society but maybe if we bring upon positive changes in the virtual world we can enjoy a bit more freedom and respect in the real one." -Ana Alvarez-Errecalde

You can see Ana's groundbreaking work on her website. Facebook removed her photography page over a year ago and will not reinstate it.






Monday, October 27, 2014

Removed: Award-winning artist Aleah Chapin's Facebook Page


Aleah Chapin has a new exhibition at the Flowers Gallery in London Photo: Antonio Parente 2014
The Facebook fan page for artist Aleah Chapin was shut down several days ago for violating Facebook's community standards. The page had more than 8,000 'likes' and was growing in popularity with her recent London exhibit.

Facebook's community standards read:

Facebook has a strict policy against the sharing of pornographic content and any explicitly sexual content where a minor is involved. We also impose limitations on the display of nudity. We aspire to respect people’s right to share content of personal importance, whether those are photos of a sculpture like Michelangelo's David or family photos of a child breastfeeding.

Chapin's work has been all over Facebook in recent weeks. A blurb from a recent Telegraph article explains her work, which is certainly comparable to The David in my mind.

"Chapin’s work has also shone a light on the subject of body image.

“Most women have issues and I’m not immune to that,” says Chapin. “We’re told that our bodies are supposed to be a ‘certain height, certain size, certain weight’. But the pictures we see are completely unrealistic; they’re very Photoshopped.

“We all know it when we look at them in magazines and yet, we still compare ourselves.

“That’s why we need images that show all sorts of bodies – so we can accept every size and shape.”

This attitude is why her work resonates. We may not recognise the individuals depicted in paint, but we recognise them as people"




You can read more about work in this Telegraph article: What Painting Portraits of Naked Women has Taught Me


Update: 2:25PM PST The page is back up.  It was reportedly taken down in "error". Please show the page your support!

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

By removing photos of childbirth, Facebook is censoring powerful female images

"Birth is a fundamental feminist issue right now - women’s bodies should not be sanitised. Facebook should let us see it as it is."

Great article in The Guardian today by Milli Hill of Positive Birth Movement.

Photo


Sunday, October 12, 2014

Bare Reality Page Owner Targeted Again



"My personal account has been blocked again - for seven days. This time it's because I shared a photograph from 'Bare Reality' of a 101 year old woman who has had a mastectomy. Yet photographs of mastectomies are supposed to be permitted by ...Facebook. This is another instance of Facebook applying it's own rules inconsistently - it smacks of sexism and this time age discrimination as well. A photograph of a younger woman with a mastectomy is still up. Is an old woman's remaining breast unacceptable?

I'm not sure why anyone who finds photographs of breasts and mastectomies offensive is visiting this page. Secondly, why are they so offended by an image of that incredible woman's body?

I think the same person keeps reporting me because I detect the same officious tone in the 'different' anonymous accounts used on Facebook and Twitter. Interestingly, Facebook requires me to send them government-issued ID to prove my identity, while the people who report hide behind 'fake' identities. Officious reporter - get a life please?"
Please support the Bare Reality page.

Monday, September 8, 2014

Former Facebook Employee Launches Women.Com, The Internet’s First Women-Only Social Network by Carolyn Cox

Screenshot 2014-09-04 at 3.54.24 PM


Recent events have shown that the Internet is a safe and inclusive space for all women (JK, LOL, AHOO-HOO-HAH-HAH). Thankfully, former Facebook employee Susan Johnson has launched Women.com, a question-driven social media site that may make that dream as close to a reality as possible—and considering her aspirations for the platform, I couldn’t be more excited.

Women.com is still in an invite-only beta stage (you can request to join via Twitter. I’m hoping to check out the party soon), and, much like Yahoo Answers, is a forum where users can pose questions and then upvote results. However, unlike the anonymous respondents on Yahoo, a Women.Com account links back to the user’s Facebook. This way members have some accountability even when accessing a more private platform than Facebook to pose tricky questions. (Slate’s article on Women.com lists a sample question as “Friend’s husband is cheating. Do I say something?” Not necessarily a question you want on your wall, unless the answer is definitely “yes.”)

Read more here.